Monthly Archives: January 2015

Manage quick responses Save time with preset replies ANDROID TIPS

Manage quick responses Save time with preset replies

You may be familiar with the feature of the Messaging app whereby you can send pre-written messages with just a couple of taps. This allows acknowledgement while not having to spend time typing a message. The same can be done with the built-in Email app (although not the Gmail app). To do this, open a message and tap the Reply icon. Then, …

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Search for messages Find them quickly ANDROID TIPS

Search your inbox with the Email app

If you need to find information from an email, the Email app’s search function looks for email addresses and message contents. To search, tap the magnifying glass icon on the top row of the Email app. This will open a search box. The Email app will provide predictions of what you may be searching for as you …

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Use email folders Keep your emails organised ANDROID TIPS

Use email folders

It is not possible to create new folders with the Email app. However, it is possible to move messages from one folder to another. This can be done with individual messages or bulk selections. Start by either opening a message, or selecting multiple messages. To do the latter, make sure you’re in the message …

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Add signatures Custom sign-offs ANDROID TIPS

Add signatures Custom sign-offs

The built-in Email app does not support multiple signatures on individual accounts. However, it is possible to change the signature for each email account on your phone. Assuming you have multiple accounts (described in this guide), open the Email app and tap the Menu icon (three dots) at the top right, then select Settings. From the Settings screen, tap on the account that …

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Mark messages as… Change read and star statuses ANDROID TIPS

Mark messages as…

Read and starred states can both be changed while viewing individual messages, or in bulk from the inbox. Make a bulk selection by tapping the lefthand icons. The envelope icon on the toolbar will toggle the messages’ read state. Add or removing stars (ie favourites) can be done by opening the menu and tapping Add/Remove Star. Tapping each star in this view will …

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Run multiple inboxes Check multiple email accounts from one app ANDROID TIPS

After having created multiple email accounts, following the instructions above, you may switch between them by opening the Email app and swiping in from the left-hand side of the screen. At the top of the list, you will see all of the accounts that you added. Tapping on any of them will take you to the inbox of that account, with its subfolders available on the left-swipe list. If you want a view a merged inbox of all your accounts, swipe in from the left-hand side and tap the ‘Combined view’ option.

After having created multiple email accounts, following the instructions above, you may switch between them by opening the Email app and swiping in from the left-hand side of the screen. At the top of the list, you will see all of the accounts that you added. Tapping on any of them will take you to the inbox of that account, with its subfolders …

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Add an account Configure email accounts ANDROID TIPS

Add an account Configure email accounts

Launch the Email app, then open the menu by tapping the three-dots icon. On the following screen, tap the words ‘ADD ACCOUNT’. If using popular email services, you can simply enter your email address and password and tap Next. If that method fails, tap the ‘Manual setup’ button after (re-)entering the email address and …

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Trojan Ports

TCP 1 Breach.2001, SocketsDeTroie.230, SocketsDeTroie.250 TCP 28 Amanda.200 TCP 31 MastersParadise.920 TCP 68 Subseven.100 TCP 142 NetTaxi.180 TCP 146 Infector.141, Intruder.100, Intruder.100 TCP 171 ATrojan.200 TCP 285 WCTrojan.100 TCP 286 WCTrojan.100 TCP 334 Backage.310 TCP 370 NeuroticKat.120, NeuroticKat.130 TCP 413 Coma.109 TCP 420 Breach.450 TCP 555 Id2001.100, PhaseZero.100, StealthSpy.100 TCP 623 Rtb666.160 TCP 660 Zaratustra.100 TCP 661 Noknok.800, Noknok.820 TCP 666 BackConstruction.210, BackConstruction.250, Bla.100, Bla.200, Bla.400, Bla.503, Cain.150, Dimbus.100, Noknok.820, Ripper.100, SatansBackdoor.100, SatansBackdoor.101, SatansBackdoor.102, Unicorn.100, Unicorn.101, Unicorn.110 TCP 667 SniperNet.210, Snipernet.220 TCP 668 Unicorn.101, Unicorn.110 TCP 680 Rtb666.160 TCP 777 Tiny.100, Undetected.230, Undetected.300, Undetected.310, Undetected.320, Undetected.330, Undetected.331, Undetected.332 TCP 785 NetworkTerrorist.100 TCP 800 NeuroticKitten.010 TCP 831 NeuroticKat.100, NeuroticKat.120, NeuroticKat.130 TCP 901 NetDevil.130, NetDevil.140 TCP 1000 DerSpaeher.200 TCP 1001 Silencer.100 TCP 1008 AutoSpy.100 TCP 1010 DerSpaeher.200 TCP 1015 Doly.150 TCP 1111 TPort.100 TCP 1130 Noknok.800, Noknok.820 TCP 1207 SoftWAR.100 TCP 1243 Subseven.100, SubSeven.110, SubSeven.180, SubSeven.190, Subseven.200 TCP 1245 VoodooDoll.006 TCP 1269 Matrix.130 TCP 1480 RemoteHack.130 TCP 1568 RemoteHack.100, RemoteHack.110 TCP 1600 DirectConnection.100 TCP 1601 DirectConnection.100 TCP 1602 DirectConnection.100 TCP 1634 NetCrack.100 TCP 1784 Snid.120, Snid.212 TCP 1999 TransmissionScout.100, TransmissionScout.110 TCP 2000 ATrojan.200, InsaneNetwork.400 TCP 2001 DIRT.220, TrojanCow.100 TCP 2003 TransmissionScout.100, TransmissionScout.110 TCP 2023 RipperPro.100 TCP 2040 InfernoUploader.100 TCP 2115 Bugs.100 TCP 2140 DeepThroat.100, DeepThroat.200, DeepThroat.310 TCP 2332 SilentSpy.202 TCP 2589 Dagger.140 TCP 2600 DigitalRootbeer.100 TCP 2989 Rat.200 TCP 3128 MastersParadise.970 TCP 3129 MastersParadise.920, MastersParadise.970 TCP 3150 DeepThroat.100, DeepThroat.200, DeepThroat.310, MiniBacklash.110 TCP 3215 BlackStar.100, Ghost.230 TCP 3333 Daodan.123 TCP 3410 OptixPro.100, OptixPro.110 TCP 3456 Force.155, TerrorTrojan.100 TCP 3505 AutoSpy.130, AutoSpy.140 TCP 3586 Snid.120, Snid.212 TCP 3700 PortalOfDoom.100 TCP 3723 Mantis.100 TCP 3800 Eclypse.100 TCP 3996 RemoteAnything.364 TCP 4000 SkyDance.220, SkyDance.229 TCP 4201 Wartrojan.160, Wartrojan.200 TCP 4225 SilentSpy.202 TCP 4321 Bobo.100 TCP 4444 AlexTrojan.200, Crackdown.100 TCP 4488 EventHorizon.100 TCP 4523 Celine.100 TCP 4545 InternalRevise.100, RemoteRevise.150 TCP 4567 FileNail.100 TCP 4666 Mneah.100 TCP 4950 ICQTrojan.100 TCP 5005 Aladino.060 TCP 5025 Keylogger.WMRemote.100 TCP 5031 NetMetro.104 TCP 5032 NetMetro.104 TCP 5033 NetMetro.104 TCP 5050 RoxRat.100 TCP 5151 OptixLite.020, OptixLite.030, OptixLite.040 TCP 5190 MBomber.100 TCP 5277 WinShell.400 TCP 5343 WCRat.100 TCP 5400 BackConstruction.120, BackConstruction.150, BladeRunner.080, DeepThroat.300 TCP 5401 BackConstruction.120, BackConstruction.150, BackConstruction.210, BackConstruction.250, BladeRunner.080, DeepThroat.300, Mneah.100 TCP 5402 BackConstruction.210, BackConstruction.250, BladeRunner.080, DeepThroat.300, Mneah.100 TCP 5534 TheFlu.100 TCP 5550 XTCP.200, XTCP.201 TCP 5555 Noxcape.100, Noxcape.200 TCP 5695 Assassin.100 TCP 5714 WinCrash.100 TCP 5741 WinCrash.100 TCP 5742 WinCrash.103 TCP 5802 Y3KRat.160 TCP 5810 Y3KRat.160 TCP 5838 Y3KRat.170 TCP 5858 Y3KRat.110, Y3KRat.120, Y3KRat.140 TCP 5880 Y3KRat.140 TCP 5881 Y3KRat.110, Y3KRat.120, Y3KRat.140 TCP 5882 Y3KRat.100, Y3KRat.110, Y3KRat.120, Y3KRat.140, Y3KRat.150 TCP 5883 Y3KRat.110, Y3KRat.140 TCP 5884 Y3KRat.140, Y3KRat.150 TCP 5885 Y3KRat.110, Y3KRat.120, Y3KRat.140 TCP 5886 Y3KRat.120, Y3KRat.140 TCP 5887 Y3KRat.110, Y3KRat.120, Y3KRat.140 TCP 5888 Y3KRat.100, Y3KRat.110, Y3KRat.120, Y3KRat.140, Y3KRat.150 TCP 5889 Y3KRat.100, Y3KRat.110, Y3KRat.120, Y3KRat.140, Y3KRat.150 TCP 5890 Y3KRat.140 TCP 6400 Thething.100, Thething.150 TCP 6556 AutoSpy.120, AutoSpy.122 TCP 6655 Aqua.020 TCP 6660 LameSpy.095 TCP 6666 LameRemote.100, ProjectMayhem.100 TCP 6669 Vampire.100 TCP 6670 DeepThroat.200, DeepThroat.210 TCP 6671 DeepThroat.310 TCP 6699 HostControl.101 TCP 6711 DeepThroat.300, Noknok.820, SubSeven.180, SubSeven.190 TCP 6712 Subseven.100 TCP 6713 Subseven.100 TCP 6767 NTRC.120 TCP 6776 SubSeven.180, SubSeven.190, Subseven.200 TCP 6789 Doly.200 TCP 6796 SubSeven.214 TCP 6912 ShitHeep.100 TCP 6939 Indoctrination.100 TCP 6953 Lithium.100 TCP 6969 2000Cracks.100, Bigorna.100, Danton.110, Danton.210, Danton.220, Danton.310, Danton.320, Danton.330, GateCrasher.110, NetController.108, Sparta.110, VagrNocker.120 TCP 6970 Danton.330 TCP 7001 Freak88.100 TCP 7119 Massaker.100 TCP 7200 Massaker.110 TCP 7300 Coced.221 TCP 7301 Coced.221 TCP 7306 NetSpy.200, NetSpy.200 TCP 7410 Phoenix.190, Phoenix.200 TCP 7511 Genue.100 TCP 7609 Snid.120, Snid.212 TCP 7614 Wollf.130 TCP 7648 BlackStar.100, Ghost.230 TCP 7788 Last.2000, Matrix.200 TCP 7826 MiniOblivion.010, Oblivion.010 TCP 7887 SmallFun.110 TCP 7891 Revenger.100 TCP 7979 VagrNocker.200 TCP 7997 VagrNocker.200 TCP 8000 XConsole.100 TCP 8011 Way.240 TCP 8012 Ptakks.215, Ptakks.217 TCP 8110 LoseLove.100 TCP 8111 LoseLove.100 TCP 8301 LoseLove.100 TCP 8302 LoseLove.100 TCP 8372 NetBoy.100 TCP 8720 Connection.130 TCP 8734 AutoSpy.110 TCP 8811 Force.155 TCP 8899 Last.2000 TCP 9000 Aristotles.100 TCP 9301 LoseLove.100 TCP 9400 InCommand.100, InCommand.110, InCommand.120, InCommand.130, InCommand.140, InCommand.150, InCommand.153, InCommand.160, InCommand.167, InCommand.170 TCP 9401 InCommand.100, InCommand.110, InCommand.170 TCP 9402 InCommand.100, InCommand.110 TCP 9561 CRatPro.110 TCP 9563 CRatPro.110 TCP 9580 TheefLE.100 TCP 9696 Danton.210, Ghost.230 TCP 9697 Danton.320, Danton.330, Ghost.230 TCP 9870 R3C.100 TCP 9872 PortalOfDoom.100 TCP 9873 PortalOfDoom.100 TCP 9874 PortalOfDoom.100 TCP 9875 PortalOfDoom.100 TCP 9876 Rux.100, SheepGoat.100 TCP 9877 SmallBigBrother.020 TCP 9878 SmallBigBrother.020, TransmissionScout.100, TransmissionScout.110, TransmissionScout.120 TCP 9879 SmallBigBrother.020 TCP 9999 ForcedEntry.100, Infra.100, Prayer.120, Prayer.130, TakeOver.200, TakeOver.300 TCP 10001 DTr.130, DTr.140 TCP 10013 Amanda.200 TCP 10067 PortalOfDoom.100 TCP 10100 Gift.240 TCP 10101 NewSilencer.100 TCP 10167 PortalOfDoom.100 TCP 10528 HostControl.100, HostControl.260 TCP 10607 Coma.109 TCP 10666 Ambush.100 TCP 11011 Amanda.200 TCP 11050 HostControl.101 TCP 11051 HostControl.100, HostControl.260 TCP 11223 AntiNuke.100, Progenic.100, Progenic.110 TCP 11225 Cyn.100, Cyn.103, Cyn.120 TCP 11306 Noknok.800, Noknok.820 TCP 11831 Katux.200, Latinus.140, Latinus.150, Pest.100, Pest.400 TCP 11991 PitfallSurprise.100 TCP 12043 Frenzy.2000 TCP 12345 Fade.100, Netbus.160, Netbus.170, VagrNocker.400 TCP 12346 Netbus.160, Netbus.170 TCP 12348 Bionet.210, Bionet.261, Bionet.280, Bionet.302, Bionet.305, Bionet.311, Bionet.313, Bionet.316, Bionet.317 TCP 12349 Bionet.084, Bionet.261, Bionet.280, Bionet.302, Bionet.305, Bionet.311, Bionet.313, Bionet.314, Bionet.316, Bionet.317, Bionet.401, Bionet.402 TCP 12389 KheSanh.210 TCP 12478 Bionet.210 TCP 12623 Buttman.090, Buttman.100 TCP 12624 Buttman.090, Buttman.100 TCP 12625 Buttman.100 TCP 12904 Akropolis.100, Rocks.100 TCP 13473 Chupacabra.100 TCP 13753 AFTP.010 TCP 14100 Eurosol.100 TCP 14194 CyberSpy.840 TCP 14286 HellDriver.100 TCP 14500 PCInvader.050, PCInvader.060, PCInvader.070 TCP 14501 PCInvader.060, PCInvader.070 TCP 14502 PCInvader.050, PCInvader.060, PCInvader.070 TCP 14503 PCInvader.050, PCInvader.060, PCInvader.070 TCP 14504 PCInvader.050, PCInvader.060 TCP 15092 HostControl.100, HostControl.260 TCP 15382 SubZero.100 TCP 15432 Cyn.210 TCP 15555 ICMIBC.100 TCP 16322 LastDoor.100 TCP 16484 MoSucker.110 TCP 16661 Dfch.010 TCP 16969 Progenic.100 TCP 16982 AcidShiver.100 TCP 17300 Kuang.200 TCP 17499 CrazzyNet.370, CrazzyNet.375, CrazzyNet.521 TCP 17500 CrazzyNet.370, CrazzyNet.375, CrazzyNet.521 TCP 17569 Infector.141, Infector.160, Infector.170, Infector.180, Infector.190, Infector.200, Intruder.100, Intruder.100 TCP 17593 AudioDoor.120 TCP 19191 BlueFire.035, BlueFire.041 TCP 19604 Metal.270 TCP 19605 Metal.270 TCP 19991 Dfch.010 TCP 20000 Millenium.100 TCP 20001 Millenium.100, PshychoFiles.180 TCP 20002 AcidKor.100, PshychoFiles.180 TCP 20005 MoSucker.200, MoSucker.210, MoSucker.220 TCP 21212 Schwindler.182 TCP 21554 Exploiter.100, Exploiter.110, Girlfriend.130, GirlFriend.135 TCP 21579 Breach.2001 TCP 21584 Breach.2001 TCP 21684 Intruse.134 TCP 22068 AcidShiver.110 TCP 22115 Cyn.120 TCP 22222 Prosiak.047, Ruler.141, Rux.300, Rux.400, Rux.500, Rux.600 TCP 22223 Rux.400, Rux.500, Rux.600 TCP 22456 Bla.200, Bla.503 TCP 22457 AcidShiver.120, Bla.200, Bla.503 TCP 22784 Intruzzo.110 TCP 22845 Breach.450 TCP 22847 Breach.450 TCP 23005 Infinaeon.110, NetTrash.100, Oxon.110, WinRat.100 TCP 23006 Infinaeon.110, NetTrash.100, Oxon.110, WinRat.100 TCP 23032 Amanda.200 TCP 23432 Asylum.010, Asylum.012, Asylum.013, Asylum.014, MiniAsylum.110 TCP 23456 EvilFTP.100, VagrNocker.400 TCP 23476 DonaldDick.153, DonaldDick.154, DonaldDick.155 TCP 23477 DonaldDick.153 TCP 24000 Infector.170 TCP 24307 Wildek.020 TCP 25386 MoonPie.220 TCP 25486 MoonPie.220 TCP 25555 FreddyK.100, FreddyK.200 TCP 25556 FreddyK.100 TCP 25685 MoonPie.010, MoonPie.012, MoonPie.130, MoonPie.220, MoonPie.240, MoonPie.400 TCP 25686 MoonPie.135, MoonPie.200, MoonPie.400 TCP 25982 MoonPie.135, MoonPie.200 TCP 26274 Delta.050 TCP 27160 MoonPie.135, MoonPie.200 TCP 27184 Alvgus.100, Alvgus.800 TCP 27374 Muerte.110, Subseven.210, SubSeven.213 TCP 28429 Hack'a'Tack.2000 TCP 28430 Hack'a'Tack.2000 TCP 28431 Hack'a'Tack.2000 TCP 28432 Hack'a'Tack.2000 TCP 28433 Hack'a'Tack.2000 TCP 28434 Hack'a'Tack.2000 TCP 28435 Hack'a'Tack.2000 TCP 28436 Hack'a'Tack.2000 TCP 29559 DuckToy.100, DuckToy.101, Katux.200, Latinus.140, Latinus.150, Pest.100, Pest.400 TCP 29891 Unexplained.100 TCP 30000 Infector.170 TCP 30001 Error32.100 TCP 30003 LamersDeath.100 TCP 30029 AOLTrojan.110 TCP 30100 NetSphere.127, NetSphere.130, NetSphere.131 TCP 30101 NetSphere.127, NetSphere.130, NetSphere.131 TCP 30102 NetSphere.127, NetSphere.130, NetSphere.131 TCP 30103 NetSphere.131 TCP 30947 Intruse.134 TCP 31320 LittleWitch.400, LittleWitch.420 TCP 31337 BackOrifice.120, Khaled.100, OPC.200 TCP 31415 Lithium.101 TCP 31416 Lithium.100, Lithium.101 TCP 31557 Xanadu.110 TCP 31631 CleptoManicos.100 TCP 31745 Buschtrommel.100, Buschtrommel.122 TCP 31785 Hack'a'Tack.100, Hack'a'Tack.112 TCP 31787 Hack'a'Tack.100, Hack'a'Tack.112 TCP 31789 Hack'a'Tack.100, Hack'a'Tack.112 TCP 31791 Hack'a'Tack.100, Hack'a'Tack.112 TCP 31887 BDDT.100 TCP 31889 BDDT.100 TCP 32100 ProjectNext.053 TCP 32418 AcidBattery.100 TCP 32791 Akropolis.100, Rocks.100 TCP 33291 RemoteHak.001 TCP 33333 Blackharaz.100, Prosiak.047, SubSeven.214 TCP 33577 SonOfPsychward.020 TCP 34324 TelnetServer.100 TCP 34763 Infector.180, Infector.190, Infector.200 TCP 35000 Infector.190, Infector.200 TCP 35600 Subsari.140 TCP 36794 BugBear.100 TCP 37237 Mantis.020 TCP 37651 YAT.210 TCP 37653 YAT.310 TCP 40308 Subsari.140 TCP 40412 TheSpy.100 TCP 40421 MastersParadise.970 TCP 40422 MastersParadise.970 TCP 40999 DiemsMutter.110, DiemsMutter.140 TCP 41626 Shah.100 TCP 44444 Prosiak.070 TCP 45673 Akropolis.100, Rocks.100 TCP 47262 Delta.050 TCP 48006 Fragglerock.200 TCP 49683 HolzPferd.210 TCP 50000 Infector.180 TCP 50130 Enterprise.100 TCP 50766 Fore.100 TCP 51234 Cyn.210 TCP 51966 Cafeini.080, Cafeini.110 TCP 54321 PCInvader.010 TCP 57341 NetRaider.100 TCP 57922 Bionet.084 TCP 58008 Tron.100 TCP 58009 Tron.100 TCP 59090 AcidReign.200 TCP 59211 DuckToy.100, DuckToy.101 TCP 59345 NewFuture.100 TCP 60000 DeepThroat.300, MiniBacklash.100, MiniBacklash.101, MiniBacklash.101 TCP 60411 Connection.100, Connection.130 TCP 60412 Connection.130 TCP 60552 RoxRat.100 TCP 63536 InsaneNetwork.500 TCP 63878 AphexFTP.100 TCP 63879 AphexFTP.100 TCP 64969 Lithium.100 TCP 65000 Socket.100 UDP 1 SocketsDeTroie.250 UDP 666 Bla.200, Bla.400, Bla.503, Noknok.820 UDP 1130 Noknok.800, Noknok.820 UDP 2140 DeepThroat.100, DeepThroat.200, DeepThroat.310 UDP 2989 Rat.200 UDP 3128 MastersParadise.970 UDP 3129 MastersParadise.920, MastersParadise.970 UDP 3150 DeepThroat.100, DeepThroat.200, DeepThroat.310, MiniBacklash.110 UDP 3333 Daodan.123 UDP 3800 Eclypse.100 UDP 3996 RemoteAnything.364 UDP 4000 RemoteAnything.364 UDP 5555 Daodan.123 UDP 5881 Y3KRat.110, Y3KRat.140 UDP 5882 Y3KRat.100, Y3KRat.110, Y3KRat.120, Y3KRat.140, Y3KRat.150 UDP 5883 Y3KRat.110, Y3KRat.140 UDP 5884 Y3KRat.140, Y3KRat.150 UDP 5885 Y3KRat.110, Y3KRat.120, Y3KRat.140 UDP 5886 Y3KRat.120, Y3KRat.140 UDP 5887 Y3KRat.110, Y3KRat.120, Y3KRat.140 UDP 5888 Y3KRat.100, Y3KRat.110, Y3KRat.120, Y3KRat.150 UDP 6953 Lithium.100 UDP 8012 Ptakks.217 UDP 10067 PortalOfDoom.100 UDP 10167 PortalOfDoom.100 UDP 10666 Ambush.100 UDP 11225 Cyn.100, Cyn.103, Cyn.120 UDP 11306 Noknok.800, Noknok.820 UDP 12389 KheSanh.210 UDP 12623 Buttman.090, Buttman.100 UDP 12625 Buttman.100 UDP 14100 Eurosol.100 UDP 23476 DonaldDick.155 UDP 26274 Delta.050 UDP 27184 Alvgus.100 UDP 28431 Hack'a'Tack.2000 UDP 28432 Hack'a'Tack.2000 UDP 28433 Hack'a'Tack.2000 UDP 28434 Hack'a'Tack.2000 UDP 28435 Hack'a'Tack.2000 UDP 28436 Hack'a'Tack.2000 UDP 29891 Unexplained.100 UDP 30103 NetSphere.131 UDP 31320 LittleWitch.400, LittleWitch.420 UDP 31337 BackOrifice.120, OPC.200 UDP 31416 Lithium.100, Lithium.101 UDP 31789 Hack'a'Tack.100, Hack'a'Tack.112 UDP 31791 Hack'a'Tack.100, Hack'a'Tack.112 UDP 33333 Blackharaz.100 UDP 47262 Delta.050 UDP 49683 HolzPferd.210 UDP 60000 MiniBacklash.100

TCP 1 Breach.2001, SocketsDeTroie.230, SocketsDeTroie.250 TCP 28 Amanda.200 TCP 31 MastersParadise.920 TCP 68 Subseven.100 TCP 142 NetTaxi.180 TCP 146 Infector.141, Intruder.100, Intruder.100 TCP 171 ATrojan.200 TCP 285 WCTrojan.100 TCP 286 WCTrojan.100 TCP 334 Backage.310 TCP 370 NeuroticKat.120, NeuroticKat.130 TCP 413 Coma.109 TCP 420 Breach.450 TCP 555 Id2001.100, PhaseZero.100, StealthSpy.100 TCP …

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Translating Binary to Text-2

Translating Binary to Text: The Hard Way A Tutorial for those willing to Learn Contents 1. Introduction 2. The Binary System 3. Converting Binary to ASCII (Text) Introduction: We’ve all seen binary code. We’ve come to think of them as a bunch of ones and zeroes in long strings… 010010101010101001101011 But these ones and zeroes can also represent decimal numbers. First off, I will show you how to read these numbers as the decimal numbers we’re used to in our daily life. Then, I will show you how to use those numbers and your keypad to translate them into text. Note that your computer doesn’t use the decimal system, so technically, when it converts binary to text, it doesn’t go through the process I will show you. This is just a divertive way of explaining you how the binary system works. The Binary System: Here’s a simple example of binary: 10101 Let’s think of the example above as empty slots: _ _ _ _ _ First off, you read binary from right-to-left. It’s just the way it’s designed. The first slot from the right represents a value of one, the second from the right a value of two, the third from the right a value of four, the fourth from the right a value of eight, the fifth from the right a value of sixteen, and the cycle continues by multiples of 2. This will never change. By putting a 1 or a 0 in those slots you are either saying you want to corresponding value that’s attached to that slot or you don’t. A 1 means yes, and a 0 means no. For example, putting a zero in the first slot from the right, but a 1 in the second slot from the right means you want a two, but not a one: _ _ _ 1 0 As such, the number above equals to a decimal value of two. As an example, let’s say you want to represent eight in binary form. Well, thinking about the slots, you want the first slot to be 0 because you don’t want a one, you want the second slot to also be 0 because you don’t want a two, you want the third slot to also to be 0 because you don’t want a four, but you want the fifth slot to be 1 because you want a value of eight. As such, eight in binary form is: 1 0 0 0 (or simply 1000 without those underlines) Now it is important to note that the amount of zeroes that precede the first value of one from the left is unimportant. So for example: 1 0 0 0 is the same as 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 (1000 = 000100) To get it cleared up, here’s another example: 0 1 is the same as 1 Exercises: What do the following equal in decimal terms? a) 100 b] 000100 c) 100000 d) 0010 Answers: a) 4 b] 4 c) 32 d) 2 If you got the answers above right, then you pretty much understand the basics of binary. Let’s now understand how to get the corresponding decimal values to the numbers which are not multiples of 2. To get the total value of a binary number, add the values corresponding to each slot. So, for example, three in binary would be: 11 The above corresponds to three because if you add the total values of all the slots, that is to say a one from the slot to the right, and a two from the second slot to the right, then it equals three. As another example, let’s say you want to represent 5 in binary terms. Then you would need a value of one to be added to a value of four, and you would not want a value of two: 101 [Reading from the right: 1(one) + 0(two) + 1(four) = five] Here’s an additional example: 001011 [Reading from the right: 1(one) + 1(two) + 0(four) + 1(eight) + 0(sixteen) + 0(thirty-two) = eleven) Exercises: What do the following equal in decimal terms? a) 11011 b] 110 c) 010101 d) 10110 Answers: a) 27 b] 6 c) 21 d) 22 If you got the above questions correct [without cheating], then you essentially understand the binary system. Understanding the binary system was the hard part. What follows is pretty easy. 3. Converting Binary to ASCII (Text) ASCII is essentially the letters, numbers and symbols that are stored in our computers through the use of fonts. When the keyboard relays the buttons you pressed, it sends in a code which is then converted to the ASCII equivalent of “k” or “5” or whatever key you pressed. Here’s an example of a message “hidden” in binary text: 0100100001100101011011000110110001101111 Now there are only so many letters, numbers and symbols stored for ASCII. Having sets of 8 digits for their binary equivalent is more than enough to represent all of these letters and the like. As such, all strings that represent text like in the above are separated into bits of 8 for simplicity: 01001000 01100101 01101100 01101100 01101111 Okay, so our example message was separated into 8 digit strings. The decimal value for each of these strings in the example was calculated for you. 01001000 = 72 01100101 = 101 01101100 = 108 01101100 = 108 01101111 = 111 The result was 72,101,108,108,111. Now, there is something called the ASCII table. It essentially corresponds to the binary numbers from yore to the equivalent letters/symbols/numbers. But since we found the decimal values of these binary strings, we can use a major shortcut. By pressing ALT + [The Number], you will get the ASCII equivalent of that number. For example, by pressing the ALT key and at then (while keeping it down) the numbers 72 in any text editor, you will get the corresponding “H” to show up. Let’s do so for the entire example message: 72 = H 101 = e 108 = l 108 = l 111 = o So the entire “hidden” message translates to “Hello”. Exercise: Decode the following message 010000110110111101101110011001110111001001100001011101000111010101101100011000010111010001 101001011011110110111001110011 00100001 Hint: The first step on your way to decoding the message (separated into bytes for you) 01000011 01101111 01101110 01100111 01110010 01100001 01110100 01110101 01101100 01100001 01110100 01101001 01101111 01101110 01110011 00100001 PS. Please note that this is the information as I've come to understand it. As such, it's somewhat easier to understand, but it may not necessarily be accurate. In other words, if another source contradicts what has been indicated here, that source is probably right. This text was completely written up by me, with no other sources for aid. If you wish to distribute this text, feel free to do so, but I would appreciate it if you contacted me first.

Translating Binary to Text Contents 1. Introduction 2. The Binary System 3. Converting Binary to ASCII (Text) Introduction: We’ve all seen binary code. We’ve come to think of them as a bunch of ones and zeroes in long strings… 010010101010101001101011 But these ones and zeroes can also represent decimal numbers. …

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Translating Binary To Text

Translating Binary to Text: The Hard Way A Tutorial for those willing to Learn Contents 1. Introduction 2. The Binary System 3. Converting Binary to ASCII (Text) Introduction: We’ve all seen binary code. We’ve come to think of them as a bunch of ones and zeroes in long strings… 010010101010101001101011 But these ones and zeroes can also represent decimal numbers. First off, I will show you how to read these numbers as the decimal numbers we’re used to in our daily life. Then, I will show you how to use those numbers and your keypad to translate them into text. Note that your computer doesn’t use the decimal system, so technically, when it converts binary to text, it doesn’t go through the process I will show you. This is just a divertive way of explaining you how the binary system works. The Binary System: Here’s a simple example of binary: 10101 Let’s think of the example above as empty slots: _ _ _ _ _ First off, you read binary from right-to-left. It’s just the way it’s designed. The first slot from the right represents a value of one, the second from the right a value of two, the third from the right a value of four, the fourth from the right a value of eight, the fifth from the right a value of sixteen, and the cycle continues by multiples of 2. This will never change. By putting a 1 or a 0 in those slots you are either saying you want to corresponding value that’s attached to that slot or you don’t. A 1 means yes, and a 0 means no. For example, putting a zero in the first slot from the right, but a 1 in the second slot from the right means you want a two, but not a one: _ _ _ 1 0 As such, the number above equals to a decimal value of two. As an example, let’s say you want to represent eight in binary form. Well, thinking about the slots, you want the first slot to be 0 because you don’t want a one, you want the second slot to also be 0 because you don’t want a two, you want the third slot to also to be 0 because you don’t want a four, but you want the fifth slot to be 1 because you want a value of eight. As such, eight in binary form is: 1 0 0 0 (or simply 1000 without those underlines) Now it is important to note that the amount of zeroes that precede the first value of one from the left is unimportant. So for example: 1 0 0 0 is the same as 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 (1000 = 000100) To get it cleared up, here’s another example: 0 1 is the same as 1 Exercises: What do the following equal in decimal terms? a) 100 b] 000100 c) 100000 d) 0010 Answers: a) 4 b] 4 c) 32 d) 2 If you got the answers above right, then you pretty much understand the basics of binary. Let’s now understand how to get the corresponding decimal values to the numbers which are not multiples of 2. To get the total value of a binary number, add the values corresponding to each slot. So, for example, three in binary would be: 11 The above corresponds to three because if you add the total values of all the slots, that is to say a one from the slot to the right, and a two from the second slot to the right, then it equals three. As another example, let’s say you want to represent 5 in binary terms. Then you would need a value of one to be added to a value of four, and you would not want a value of two: 101 [Reading from the right: 1(one) + 0(two) + 1(four) = five] Here’s an additional example: 001011 [Reading from the right: 1(one) + 1(two) + 0(four) + 1(eight) + 0(sixteen) + 0(thirty-two) = eleven) Exercises: What do the following equal in decimal terms? a) 11011 b] 110 c) 010101 d) 10110 Answers: a) 27 b] 6 c) 21 d) 22 If you got the above questions correct [without cheating], then you essentially understand the binary system. Understanding the binary system was the hard part. What follows is pretty easy. 3. Converting Binary to ASCII (Text) ASCII is essentially the letters, numbers and symbols that are stored in our computers through the use of fonts. When the keyboard relays the buttons you pressed, it sends in a code which is then converted to the ASCII equivalent of “k” or “5” or whatever key you pressed. Here’s an example of a message “hidden” in binary text: 0100100001100101011011000110110001101111 Now there are only so many letters, numbers and symbols stored for ASCII. Having sets of 8 digits for their binary equivalent is more than enough to represent all of these letters and the like. As such, all strings that represent text like in the above are separated into bits of 8 for simplicity: 01001000 01100101 01101100 01101100 01101111 Okay, so our example message was separated into 8 digit strings. The decimal value for each of these strings in the example was calculated for you. 01001000 = 72 01100101 = 101 01101100 = 108 01101100 = 108 01101111 = 111 The result was 72,101,108,108,111. Now, there is something called the ASCII table. It essentially corresponds to the binary numbers from yore to the equivalent letters/symbols/numbers. But since we found the decimal values of these binary strings, we can use a major shortcut. By pressing ALT + [The Number], you will get the ASCII equivalent of that number. For example, by pressing the ALT key and at then (while keeping it down) the numbers 72 in any text editor, you will get the corresponding “H” to show up. Let’s do so for the entire example message: 72 = H 101 = e 108 = l 108 = l 111 = o So the entire “hidden” message translates to “Hello”. Exercise: Decode the following message 010000110110111101101110011001110111001001100001011101000111010101101100011000010111010001 101001011011110110111001110011 00100001 Hint: The first step on your way to decoding the message (separated into bytes for you) 01000011 01101111 01101110 01100111 01110010 01100001 01110100 01110101 01101100 01100001 01110100 01101001 01101111 01101110 01110011 00100001 PS. Please note that this is the information as I've come to understand it. As such, it's somewhat easier to understand, but it may not necessarily be accurate. In other words, if another source contradicts what has been indicated here, that source is probably right. This text was completely written up by me, with no other sources for aid. If you wish to distribute this text, feel free to do so, but I would appreciate it if you contacted me first.

Translating Binary to Text: The Hard Way A Tutorial for those willing to Learn Contents 1. Introduction 2. The Binary System 3. Converting Binary to ASCII (Text) Introduction: We’ve all seen binary code. We’ve come to think of them as a bunch of ones and zeroes in long strings… 010010101010101001101011 …

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